Cape Malays…

and their Heritage

Defining the Cape Malay Identity

Posted by tahirfarrath on June 3, 2010

Like many South Africans, people described in some situations as “Cape Malay” are often the descendants of people from many continents and religions. As much as the Cape Malay identity is a definition of an ethnic group, it can be considered as the product of a set of histories and communities. Since many Cape Malay people have found their Muslim identity to be more salient than their “Malay” ancestry, people in one situation have been described as “Cape Malay”, and in another as “Cape Muslim” by people both inside and outside of the community.

The “Cape Malay” identity was also a subcategory of the “Coloured” category, in the terms of the apartheid-era government’s classifications of ethnicity. From the early 1970s to the present, some members of this community – particularly those with a political allegiance to broader liberation movements in South Africa – have identified as “black” in the terms of the Black Consciousness Movement.

Language

People in the Cape Malay community generally speak mostly Afrikaans but also English, or a local dialect of both. They no longer speak the Malay languages and other languages which their ancestors used, although various Malay words and phrases are still employed in daily usage.

Dress code

(Cape Malay women wear some version of the Muslim headscarf for religious reasons, which is mostly observed with long skirts or Middle Eastern attire at Muslim gatherings. Men often wear skull caps or turbans and don Arabian-style robes when going to the mosque. Red fezzes worn with suit and ties for certain occasions were the fashion among the elders. Fezzes have been replaced by high white Kufiyas. The fashion has evolved to Western forms of casual wear making it harder to distinguish the Cape Malays from non-Muslims. Some Cape Malay women, however, have adopted a variation of the knee length top and long pants, resembling the Pakistanis and Indians, rather than the long skirts worn by Malaysians and Indonesians.)

(M. Tahir Farrath in the 1980s)

Food

The community’s strict culture and traditions of Halaal food have also left an impact that is still felt to this day. Adaptations of traditional foods such as bredie, bobotie, sosaties and koeksisters are staples in many South African homes. Muslims will generally not attend any function where alcohol is present.

Marriage

(A Cape Malay engagement would mark a private ceremony where the prospective in-laws come to ask the father of the girl for [pre-marital] visiting rights before a marriage date is set.

On the day of the wedding the bridegroom and the respective fathers, accompanied by other male relatives, head to mosque where the bridegroom now asks to be married upon an agreed dowry [which may include some of the prized contents of the bride’s living quarters]. The father of the bride will accept the arrangement in the presence of witnesses before the ritual begins. While this is happening, the bride and her wedding party will get ready for the groom’s arrival and the placing of the wedding band on her finger.

From left: Hadji Abdullah Abader, M. Tahir Farrath and Shaykh Shamiel Pandie witnessing the Wedding ceremony at Masjid-ut-Taqwa (P.E.).

The groom heads home and sends a party to the bride’s home with food and gifts. At a typical Cape Malay wedding thereafter, which is never small, the bride’s family traditionally presents the bridal couple with a lavish wedding feast at a communal hall. Indiscriminate intermingling of sexes is frowned upon among Muslims. Other  than for the headgear (Medora), the bride and groom’s attire are very Westernised. A few older ladies (dressed in Moroccan styled gear) would then prepare the bride for her new abode where she is received and supplications made.)

(al-Ustaath) Toyer Farrath conducting a Doepmal

A Doepmaal or Doopmal (name-giving ceremony and Feast) isusually held in the parents’ home seven days after the birth of each child. Boys are often circumcised before the Doepmal.

Music

This cultural group developed a characteristic ‘Cape Malay’ music. An interesting secular folk song type, of Dutch origin, is termed the nederlandslied. The language and musical style of this genre reflects the history of South African slavery; it is often described and perceived as ‘sad’ and ’emotional’ in content and context. The nederlandslied shows the influence of the Arabesque (ornamented) style of singing. This style (sometimes sung along with the banjo, percussion drums [Gomma], tamborines [Rebanna] and flute, etc.) is unique in South Africa, Africa and probably in the world. Active dancing to musical beats is frowned upon in Islam. Qasidas and Solawaat songs are also very popular.

Artefacts and Symbols

Islamic decorative art is mainly expressed in geometric forms in calligraphy, architecture and textile art, as the depiction of human and animal figures is forbidden in Islam. (Other than these, there are barely any artefacts and symbols remaining to cherish.)

Straw hat (toering) and Kaparang (wooden slipper)

Spirituality

Images of decorative art in mosques around South Africa all form part of oneness of the Divine. Islamic art reflects unity and the perfection of the proportion and symmetry of God’s creation. With contemplation and understanding, these elements all reveal deeper meaning according to the Islamic way of life. Qur’anic calligraphy is regarded as the highest form of Islamic art, and as such, the patterns that illuminate the text carry a high standard of aesthetic harmony and discipline, balance and stability. (Cape Malays being strict adherents of the pillars of Islam, also gather for Hajat, Arwag, Hadad, Sufi Thikr, Mawlud, Ratiep, Batcha and Qirat.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Malays

M. Tahir Farrath delivering a talk at a religious occasion

The Hājah is one of the names given to a customary religious ceremony whereby specific chapters of the holy Qur’ān are recited, praises of Allah and His messenger, Prophet Muhammad(pbuh) are rendered, the Riwāyāt (historical narrations) of ‘al-Barzanjī and the ‘Ashraqal are recited and concluded with a supplication for mercy and forgiveness (Du`ā’ Khatam ‘al-Qur’ān).Some of the other names given to this ceremony are the werk – the Afrikaans translation of the Arabic word `amal which means good deeds and ‘arwāḥ meaning spirits (of the deceased persons). This probably pertains to the fact that in the final supplication, special emphasis is made upon supplicating on behalf of deceased persons.

The Hājah has especially been associated with the 7th, 40th and 100th day commemoration of a deceased person. The tradition may have been inherited from the pioneering Indonesian slaves and political exiles, such as Shaykh Yūsuf of the Khalwatiy-yah Sūfi order, who were strong adherents of their tradition and culture. There is the short form or long form that includes Sūrah Yaasiin and Sūrah Mulk, The compilation, in detail, includes:

– the recitation of Sūrahs Yāsīn, ‘al-Mulk, ‘al-‘Ikhlās, ‘al-Falaq, ‘an-Nās, al-Fātihah

– the first and last part of ‘al-Baqarah including ‘āyāt ‘al-Kursi,

– the recitation of the 99 names of Allah (‘Asmā ‘al-Husnā),

– salutations on the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh), his family and companions.

Part 1: Haajaat – Arwaah by M. Tahir Farrath – YouTube Video.

In some cases, it can be a unique handpicked compilation of various sections of the Riwāyāt Sūrāt.

– a part of the Qasīdat ‘al-Burdah referred to locally as the “Yā ‘Akraman” or the “Dhikr Jalālī”,

– a part of the Maulūd of ‘al-Barzanjī,

– finally the ‘Ashraqal and concluded with a supplication (du`ā’).

M. Tahir Farrath in Qiraat.

Imaam Zahid Farrath (left) with Imaam Behardien Jappie (right) and Imaam Sadaka Abader slightly in view

The Hājah has its textual origins in the Riwāyat Sūrat. It played an important role in the cultural practices of local Muslims in the Cape. The Riwāyat Sūrat is comprised of variety of texts written by different authors. The texts include:

Maulid Sharaf ‘al-‘Anām : The Maulid Sharaf ‘al-‘Anām is a text with narrations and poetry about the birth and life of the Prophet of Islām. The poetry was written by an `Irāqi scholar by the name of al-Bukhārī (not to be confused with the famous eighth century Hadīth scholar). In the Cape, Maulid Sharaf al-‘Anām has been reserved by local Muslims for the commemoration of the birthday (Maulūd) of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) and will be recited in the month of Rabī` al-Auw-wal. Rampie-sny is also set aside by the Muslim women for this day.

Maulid al-Barzanji : This text is also about the life of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) written by ‘Abū Ja`far ‘al-Barzanji, a fourteenth century Islamic poet who hailed from the island of Zanzibar.

Qasīdat ‘al-Burdah : The Qasīdah Burdah was written in the 13th century by the well-known scholar and poet, Sharāf ‘al-Dīn al-Busīrī who hails from Mamluke, Egypt.

Du`ā’ Khatam ‘al-Qur’ān : This translates as the supplication for concluding the recitation of the entire Qur’ān and forms the first and last part of the Riwāyat Sūrat. The religious ceremony includes the recitation of specific verses from the Holy Qur’ān, the recitation of the ‘Asmā al-Husnā (99 names of Allāh), salutations on the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh), his family and his companions, a part of the Qasīdat al-Burdah, a part of the Maulūd of Barzanji, finally the ‘Ashraqal and concluded with Du`ā’.

`Aqīdat ‘al-`awām : The `Aqīdat ‘al-`awām translates as the belief system of the general public. This text summarizes the basic tenets of Islāmic belief in poetry form.

New Zealand: The Farrath family hosting the monthly pengajian (study circle) of a mixed group of South African, Malaysian, Singaporean, Indonesian, Fijian, Egyptian and Somali Muslims

‘At-tadhkīr li shahr-Ramadān : Besides Maulūd, Dhikr and `Aqīdah the Riwāyat Sūrat also consists of specific ‘adhkār (remembrance of Allah) for the month of Ramadān.

Rātib ‘al-Haddād : The Rātib ‘al-Had-dād is literally translated as the ompilations of the blacksmith. This is a set of ‘adhkār (remembrance of Allah) compiled from authentic sources by the Sūfi Shaykh`Abd Al-lāh ibn `Alawiyy ‘al-Had-dād . The Shaykh is from the `Alawiy-yah Sūfi order and hails from Hadramaut in Yemen.

The Rātib ‘al-Had-dād or Ḥad-dād as it is sometimes referred to, is not the same as a Ḥājah even though specific sections of the Ḥājah have been incorporated into it, especially the first part.

The first part of the Ḥājah has locally been incorporated into most forms of dhikr, be it a Maulūd, Qādarī or even a Rātib ‘ar-Rifā`ī (locally known as “Ratiep”). This is locally referred to as a voor-werk (lead-in), which serves as an introduction to the actual dhikr. This is probably the reason why some of the local Muslims have used the word Ḥaddād synonymous with the word Hājah.

(Talieb Baker, former lecturer at ICOSA)


(al-Ustaath) Toyer Farrath concluding the burial rites for the Van Weiring family

The Haajah (Arwaah/Thikr/Tahliil)

From left: Eri Ansya (Phd student), Muneeb Farrath, M. Tahir Farrath 

‘Ratiep’ is a ritual performed by certain Muslim sects to demonstrate the faith in the patron saint to unbelievers by striking their body with swords and other sharp instruments. The letting of blood is rare, and quickly attended to by the officiating ‘Galiefa’, the head of the Ratiep troupe who closes the wound and stops the blood whilst reciting verses from the Koran. Here participants perform under the watchful eye of the presiding Galiefa at a family function in a backyard. The performance is accompanied by ‘labana’ drumming and the singing in chorus by the audience of verses sung by the Galiefa. Annually, on Easter weekends, thousands of Muslim families gather in the vicinity of Sheikh Yusuf’s tomb and the graves of his followers at Faure to pray (which is frowned by other Muslims) and be entertained by performances by different ‘Riefaai Jama’as’ Retieb groups.

http://www.sahistory.org.za/pages/saho%20stuff/saho%20books/ledochowski/5-gallery-CER-NEW-02.htm

Eid Day: M. Tahir Farrath and Muneeb Farrath

Dukums or “Doekoem werk” can be traced back to the days of slavery. When people are unable to make sense of their circumstances, they seek spiritual assistance. The words ‘dukum’ or ‘doekum’ is in fact a mispronunciation of a word and tradition, ‘Dukun’, which is still a major undercurrent of life in a number of islands in the Indonesian archipelago, writes local researcher, Yusuf Kamedien. Furthermore, a common treatment is to chant a prayer over a glass of water that is then given to the client to drink. Sometimes a rajah (a mystical script) is written on paper to wear or dissolved in a bottle for consumption or burnt. Some Dukoems believe that their spiritual powers are a gift from God while others say their skills were taught to them by spirits whom they continue to consult for advice on the diagnosis and treatment. Dukuns live modestly and are neither rich nor poor but have enough with which to survive.

http://www.vocfm.co.za/index.php?section=news&category=heritagenews&article=49120

Muslim faith-healers apply Islamic aspects to healing that do not warrant it being categorised as shamanism or resembling the sangoma of Africa. The use of traditional remedies and herbs is the practice of herbalism as alternative medication, which is far from being magical. These are often labels given to suit by people who are  not familiar with a culture other than their own.

Note:

If you wish to send me a “private” message, please click here Facebook.

Click here to LIKE the Cape Malays and their Heritage Blog

12 Responses to “Defining the Cape Malay Identity”

  1. revo said

    cape malay culture..
    Very very similar to SRI LANKAN MALAYS. We still speak our creole malay, have retained more culture. we were a dutch colony for 150 years, till 1815 when we became a british colony. Sri lanka is very close to Batavia. There were also less slaves, more mercennaries and exciles here. Why not research here? Dr.Revo Drahaman FRCS..DLO..MS..MBBS

  2. Achmat Damon said

    Imam Achmat Ely asks everyone to join in the worship of the One, True God on Saturday, 25 December 2010 at the Ahmedi Sunni Mosque in Victoria Road, Grassy Park. Adherents will glorify God and pronounce His Oneness, utter His Greatness, praise Him and implore God for His Forgiveness, Mercy, Guidance and Protection.
    The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah will give of their time there out of religious duty. The Qadiriyyah Dhikrullah will start after the essential Islamic Sunset Prayer and should finish after the compulsory Nightfall Prayer. Imam Achmat Ely will present a short talk at the close.
    For additional information, kindly speak to Imam Achmat Ely of ‘The Valley’, 122, 3rd Avenue, Grassy Park 7945, Western Cape, South Africa; home telephone number: +2721 705-3238.

  3. Achmat Damon said

    The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah will set off in the service of God Most High, when it celebrates the birthday of His Holy Messenger Muhammad (Upon him Be Peace) with the Ceres Muslim Jamaa’ah. On Saturday, 12 February 2011, congregants at the Trichardt Street Mosque in Ceres will remember Allah The Most Bountiful while standing and sitting. A scrumptious cooked meal will be on offer afterwards. Everyone is asked to join in.
    The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah serves as a vehicle for Islamic learning and the remembrance of Allah. The group consists of several hundred people.
    Few organizations are so immersed in the religious record and social symbolism of Cape Muslims. The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah was not formed out of enmity, or opposition to another group. Week after week, they assert the Oneness of God through adhkaar. They are afloat on the same sea, journeying towards Allah, The One Who Is With those who do right. Free of hysteria, the Jamaa’ah is autonomous and entirely open. Parents raise their children in the Jamaa’ah. Many have grown old as part of the ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan.
    Some of them sway gently with the rhythm of the dhikr; others shed tears at the mention of God’s name. The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah chant like slaves, because that’s what they are – slaves of Allah The Most Beneficent. Adhkaar to them is a labour of love.
    They neither whirl, nor do they hold hands. By reason of its size, Jamaa’ah persons don’t position themselves in a circular or semi-circular formation as is sometimes found among dhikr groups. During adhkaar, its members sit or stand in straight rows instead.
    Haji Achmat Damon al-Qadiri al-Chishti is the sheikh of the ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah. He had assumed the leadership of the group on the death of Haji Mogammad Riefaard Manie al-’Alawi al-Qadiri al-Chishti. Born on 23 November 1950 in Diep River on the Cape Flats in South Africa, Haji Achmat is the son of Imam Muhammad Salih and Hajja Amina Damon.
    The second of six children, Haji Mogammad Riefaard Manie came into the world on 7 August 1946 at 174 Schotsche Kloof Flats in Bo-Kaap. He had received the Qadiriyyah mantel from Haji Abduragmaan da Costa al-Qadiri in 1989. Haji Mogammad Riefaard Manie al-’Alawi al-Qadiri al-Chishti had passed away on 19 October 2004.
    The scholarly Haji Abduragmaan da Costa al-Qadiri was born on Friday, 10 October 1924 in Uitenhage in the Eastern Cape. His date of birth coincided with Milad al-Nabi of that year, 1343 Hijri. Having learned under the celebrated Sheikh Ismail ‘Ganief’ Edwards, Haji Abduragmaan da Costa was of the few entirely locally educated Cape Muslims of his generation who understood Arabic. Equally notable was the trend that he had started by refusing to accept payment for teaching others the tenets of their faith. Haji Abduragmaan da Costa al-Qadiri had served as the sheikh of the Qadiriyyah Jamaa’ah from 1962 until his demise on 30 August 1989.
    Unrelated otherwise, these three men easily stand above all other modern-day South Africans in furthering the cause of group dhikrullah. They transcended adhkaar in a way that no other local person has achieved since.
    Imam Achmad Moos was the group’s first Hafith al-Qur’an. He had learned under Sheikh Muhammad Salih Abadi Solomons and had served as the Imam of the Sunni Muhammad Masjid in Rondebosch East from 1969 until his death in 1986. Imam Mogammad Kasief Basardien forms part of the latest brood of huffaath. He had studied under Sheikh Abdurraghiem Hasan Sallie and the legendary Sheikh Muhammad Salih Abadi Solomons. Abdul Waarieth Parker also has the Holy Book within his breast. On 28 June 2000, Muneer Manie had the appellation ‘Hafith’ tagged in front of his name. Haji Muneer had received his hifdh schooling from Imam Abduraghmaan Salie. Haji Razeen Carelse qualified on 9 August 2000. Having committed the larger part of the Glorious Qur’an to memory in Azaadville, Gauteng, he completed his reading under the tutelage of Maulana Mogammad Adiel Johaar and Sheikh Abdullah Awaldien. Hafith Mogammad Ridha Abass was ushered into the privileged group during 2006. Umar Baba strengthened the local hifdh tradition during 2006 when he completed his education under Imam Abduraghmaan Salie. Having studied under Sheikh Abdullah Awaldien like his oldest brother Hafith Abdul Waarieth, Mogammad Hasan Parker made the grade aged twelve on 12 November 2006. Hafith Mogammad Hasan had represented his country with much success at a Quranic recital competition in Mecca during 2009 and at the Dubai International Holy Quran Awards of 2010. Haji Mogammad Qaasiem Ganief and Adieb Bassier met the standards at the end of January 2009, having qualified under Sheikh Abdullah Awaldien.
    The ‘Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah tries to offer group adhkaar as an alternative to social ills such as drug abuse and gangsterism.
    A healthy leaning towards orphan adoption exists within the group. Names are not mentioned here for reasons of propriety.
    The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah continues to travel the length and breadth of South Africa in adoration of their Maker.
    For return bus tickets to Ceres, please call Haji Bienjamien Abrahams of 10 6th Street, Kensington 7405, Western Cape, South Africa, at home telephone number +2721 5936585, or at cellular telephone number 0827728381.
    A contact person is Haji Ismail C Motala of Farm Waveren, Wolseley 6830, Western Cape, South Africa; telephone +2723 2311242, cellular telephone number 0769722555.
    To learn more about this, kindly get in touch with Hajja Kariema Thomas, residence, 11 Beta Street, Bella Vista, Ceres 6835, Western Cape, South Africa; telephone +2723 3155692, cellular telephone 0834503974.
    For further information, please speak to Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs, address, 48 Tennyson Street, Mandalay 7785, Western Cape, South Africa; home telephone +2721 3872737, or on mobile telephone number 0799153206.

  4. Abdullah bin Abdurahman al-Qādirī al-Chishtī al-Athloni said

    On the evening of Saturday, 23 July 2011, the ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah will render the Qadiriyyah Dhikrullah at the Auwal Masjid in Dorp Street, Cape Town, South Africa. Participants will repetitively mention the Name of God, trusting that He Would Mention them in a gathering better than theirs. The adhkaar will start with the Maghrib Salaah. Young and old are invited to take part. Supper will be served at end.
    For further information, please talk to Haji Mustapha Salie of 3 August Street, Cape Town 8001, Western Cape, South Africa, telephone number +2721 4248477.
    A person to approach is Haji Mogammad Tauha Sampson of 146a Buitengragt Street, Cape Town 8001, Western Cape, South Africa at home telephone number +2721 4242517.
    Interested individuals may speak to Haji Mogammad Fadlie Soeker of 59 Bloem Street, Cape Town 8001, Western Cape, South Africa at home telephone +2721 4265630.
    Another contact person is Haji Faried Abass of 3 August Street, Cape Town 8001, Western Cape, South Africa, telephone +2721 4222808, or +2721 4479350, or at cellular telephone number 0849538085.
    To learn more about this, kindly get in touch with Hafith Mogammad Ridha Abass of 3 August Street, Cape Town 8001, Western Cape, South Africa, home telephone number +2721 4222808, or at mobile telephone 0847291918.

  5. Abdullah bin Abdurahman al-Qādirī al-Chishtī al-Athloni said

    Adhkār on Saturday, 17 September 2011 at the Nurul Islam Mosque in Buitengragt Street, Bo-Kaap, will remind participants of the dramatic events that surrounded the birth in Mecca sixty one years ago of Sheikh Serag Makki Johaar. The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah will lend its’ voice to the occasion. The dhikrullāh will begin with the Maghrib Salāh. Sheikh Serag Johaar will deliver a short address at the conclusion of the Qādiriyyah. Everyone is asked to join in.

    The first of nine children, Sheikh Serag Makki Johaar was born in Mecca on Sunday, 17 September 1950CE, 5 Dhul Hijjah 1369AH. His parents, Haji Cassiem and Hajja Zainab (“Naa”, as she is called), had lodged with Sayed ’Umar Wali in Mecca at the time of his birth. Sayed ’Umar was the son of Sayed Shiraj Wali; Sayed Shiraj was the son of Sayed Zain Wali. Haji Cassiem and Hajja Zainab Johaar named their son after Sayed Shiraj; the baby’s middle name was taken after the Holy City.

    Eric Rosenthal, on pages 119 to 127 of his book “From Drury Lane to Mecca”, tells of the Ring of Immortality of Sayed Zain Wali. Its wearer, characteristically, was immune from injury or harm. Scissors typically, could not cut the hair of the person who wore the ring. The character Abdul Mallik in the story was from Bo-Kaap, South Africa and a student of the erudite Sayed Zain Wali. Abdul Mallik’s parents had “sent him to the Holy City in order that he might there learn the Faith from its most authoritative teachers.” He had received the ring on the death of his tutor. Once back home, Imam Abdul Mallik married the very pretty Kubra Regal. As a gesture of his love, and besotted by her beauty, he had allowed her to take the ring from him. The “Cape Malays are a good-looking race,” Rosenthal explains in his book. She was cheerfully doing the laundry in a local wash-house, when the ring had slipped from her finger. Kubra Regal shrieked in alarm. She was too slow in stopping it from sliding into an adjoining stream. The ring was lost forever. Cape Malay folklore has it that the remains of the wash-house stands close to the holy grave of Sayed ’Ali Mustaphā al-Haq al-Qādirī of Deer Park in Vredehoek, Cape Town. Imam Abdul Mallik and Hajja Kubra Regal, interestingly, were the parents of Hajja Fatima “Ma” Geyer (1910-1995), the first South African female to commit the contents of the Noble Qur’an to memory. Of equal note in Deer Park, is the holy grave of Sayed Muhammad Johaar.

    Days after his birth in the Holy City, Sheikh Serag Johaar’s parents had taken him along on the Pilgrimage. Sheikh Nazeem Mohamed (1935-2002) was on the Plain of ’Arafāt on the Day of Pilgrimage of that year. Observing Yaum al-’Arafah as well, were Sheikh Mohamed Ganief Booley (1924-1982) and Sheikh Mohammed Yusuf Booley (1930-2010). Standing there on 9 Dhul Hijjah 1369 Hijri, were Sheikh Ismail Soeker (d. 1986) and Sheikh Mogammad Armien Soeker (1941-2011). Also there on the Day of Wuqūf were Sheikh Mujaahied Hendricks (d. 1996) and Sheikh Mogammad Rashaad Basra (d. 1991). Pilgrims recall how hailstones “as big as hens’ eggs” had lashed the Plain of ’Arafāt on the Day of Haj. Most of the tents on the hallowed desert expanse were pulverised. People went in search of missing persons when the storm abated and found “Naa” and her baby underneath a flattened tent – ruffled, but alive. Lying dead beneath a smashed tent though, was a Catholic priest with a crucifix around his neck – he had slinked into Mecca, his motive unknown. Non-Muslims, still, are not allowed past the religious borders of Mecca and Medina.

    Sheikh Serag’s first name was misspelt at the birth registration offices in Cape Town. He grew up in the Schotsche Kloof Flats at 81 Tana Baru Street, Bo-Kaap. As a young man, he had memorised the contents of the Glorious Qur’an under the tutelage of the pious Sheikh Muhammad Salih Abadi Solomons (d. 1999). Serag was barely sixteen when he led the tarāwih salāh at the Habibia Soofie Masjid. The tarāwih salāh is optional prayer that is read in congregation, or on one’s own, by Muslims during the evenings of the Holy Month of Ramadhān. Hafith Serag acquitted himself with an assurance that far belied his youth as he recited the entire Holy Book off pat. Behind him in prayer stood some of the legends of Cape Islām – Imam Abdul Kariem Kagee al-Chishtī (1912-1986), Imam Abdullatief “Babu” Purkar al-Qādirī al-Chishtī (1926-2004) and Maulānā Goolam Kootboodien Kagee al-Chishtī (b. 1939). Sheikh Serag Johaar went on to study in Mecca and Indo-Pak, and has been back to the Hijaz many times since. He is the imam at the Nurul Islam Masjid and teaches Muslims their religion.

    To learn more about the dhikr, please get in touch with the Masjid Secretary, Haji Abdul Maliek Majiet of 2 Francis Road, Pinelands 7405, Western Cape, South Africa; home telephone number: +2721 5313975, cellular telephone 0829007344.
    Another contact person is the Masjid Treasurer, Haji Mogammad Ganief Galvaan, address, 267 Longmarket Street, Cape Town 8001, Western Cape, South Africa; home telephone +2721 423-8754, or on mobile telephone number 0824944690.
    For further information, kindly talk to Haji Mogammad Tayyib Ogier, residence, 10 Ummah Close, Zonnebloem 8001, Western Cape, South Africa; home telephone +2721 465-6133, or at cellular telephone number 0834449997.
    Interested persons may contact Sheikh Serag Makki Johaar of 154 Sussex Road, Wynberg 7800, Western Cape, South Africa; telephone: +2721 797-6543 (home), +2721 424-3933 (mother), or at 0829687254 (cellular telephone).

  6. Abdullah bin Abdurahman al-Qādirī al-Chishtī al-Athloni said

    The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah will take to the road once again when it goes to Masjid al-Taubah in Chatsworth in the Western Cape on Saturday, 28 January 2012. The Swartland town is off the N7 motorway, and 56 kilometres from Cape Town and 23 kilometres from Malmesbury. The mosque gathering there will celebrate the birth of the Beloved Prophet Muhammad (May God Almighty Bless him and Grant him Peace).

    Some of the ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah sway gently with the rhythm of the adhkaar; others shed tears at the mention of God’s name. The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah chant like slaves, because that’s what they are – slaves of Allah.

    Haji Yusef Hendricks has seen more group adhkaar than most people. Haji Faghmie Jacobs has a natural affection for dhikrullah. Plodding away since their childhood are Haji Shamiel and his brother Haji Abdul Raashied Salie. Haji Riefad Benjamin’s mother was called Qadiria – that’s how close he is to the dhikr. Haji Bienjamien Abrahams gets things done. Haji Mogammad Shadley Kariem is unbendable in his approach to adkaar. Maintaining their family traditions are Haji Mogammad Allie Isaacs, Haji Fuad Isaacs, Haji Mansoer Isaacs and Mogammad Ashraf Isaacs. Their saintly father, Haji Achmad Isaacs had an aura that shone like a lamp. Reciting with the assurance gleaned over the years, is Haji Mogammat Saliem Solomon. The bond that Haji Mogamad Fahldie Ganief has with the Jamaa’ah has endured through thick and thin. Haji Taalieb, Haji Ismail and Haji Thaabiet Ganief are following in their late father’s footsteps. Haji Rashaad Magerman is unflinching in his application. Using his organisational skills to drive the ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah forward is Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs. Setting an example through dhikr is Haji Faried Abass. Haji Ashraf Regal recites with the aplomb of his father, Haji Mogammad Cassiem and grandfather Haji Abdullah. Haji Ebrahim Ismail and his relatives beat the drum for the ‘Ibaad-u-Ragmaan. Such is their sense of community that they wish the dhikr would last forever. Haji Nadiem Adams and his family have an innate love for dhikrullah. Ashraf Arend is as regular as clockwork. Constant ‘ibadat have inclined Haji Ganief Davids and Haji Dawood Essack and their families toward lasting friendships. Adhkaar is a labour of love to Haji Mahdi Soeker. Achmat Basardien and his family have a wholesome appetite for the Qadiriyyah dhikr. Jamiel Dalvie, also, can seemingly recite forever. Sharing common values are Tasliem and his son Ridhwaan Davids. Naasief Jattiem and his family help to make things tick. Haji Abdool Raouf Bux lends vibrancy to the Jamaa’ah. Haji Mohammed Ali Guzgay is there on Imam Abdullatief ‘Babu’ Purkar’s recommendation.

    The Sheikh, Haji Achmat Damon al-Qadiri al-Chishti, will direct by example by either leading the reading of the dhikrullah himself, or he may delegate the lead for the rest of the Jamaa’ah to respond in unison and in melodious, moderate tones.

    Imam Achmat Fataar will deliver the vote of thanks. A mouth-watering meal will be served at the close. Young and old are asked to join in.

    For return bus tickets to Chatsworth, please dial Haji Bienjamien Abrahams of 10 6th Street, Kensington 7405, Western Cape, South Africa, at home telephone number +2721 593-6585, or at cellular telephone 0827728381.
    To learn more about this, kindly get in touch with Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs, address, 48 Tennyson Street, Mandalay 7785, Western Cape, South Africa; home telephone +2721 3872737, or on mobile telephone number 0799153206.
    A contact person is Imam Achmat Fataar of 604 Edward Road, Chatsworth 7354, Western Cape, South Africa, at home telephone number +2722 4813011, or cellular telephone 0837914945.
    For further information, please speak to Haji Yoonis Emeraan of 1081 Edward Road, Chatsworth 7354, Western Cape, South Africa; cellular telephone number 0715296063.
    To find out about this, kindly get in touch with Haji Mogamat C van Rhyn, 791 Chamberlain Street, Chatsworth 7354, Western Cape, South Africa; telephone: +2722 4813198.

  7. sedick mose said

    Was very enlighted to read but what makes such a unique culture fase out its beautifull no one can put claim tto it its unique yet we are prepared to pass with it madness

  8. Rashaad Abrahams said

    Inwoners van Hopefield sal vanaf ongeveer elf uur voormiddag op Saterdag, 19 Januarie 2013 Milad al-Nabi Herdenkings in die Hopefield Moskee by 2 Rivier Straat in die Platteland vier. Deelhebbers sal opnuut die geboortenis van die Heilige Profeet Muhammad (Milad al-Nabi, God se Rykste Seëninge en Geluk op hom), in gedagte bring.

    Die ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah sal ’n lesing van die Glorieryke Koran opvolg met die voorwerk en die Qadiriyyah poejies. Die voorwerk behels die uitvoering van sekere hoofstukke en spesifieke verse van die Onveranderde Koran, en ander Islamitiese gebede. Poejies is ‘kombuis’ Afrikaans vir sekere, of tipe adhkaar. Adhkaar is die meervoud van die Arabiese woord dhikr, wat ‘hulde’ bedoel.

    Plegtighede sal die Salaah (formele Moslem gebed), die dhikrullah (hulde aan God), en ’n kort toespraak deur Maulana Mogammad Rifaat Carolus insluit. Lekker kos sal bedien word.

    Geintereseerde persone kan met Haji Bienjamien Abrahams, adres, 10 6de Straat, Kensington 7405, Wes Kaap, huis telefoon nommer 021 5936585, of teen sellulêre telefoon nommer 0827728381, vir bus kaartjies na Hopefield in aanraking kom.
    Vir verdere inligting, bel vir die Moskee Sekretaris, Badr Abrahams van 429 Skool Straat, Hopefield 7355, Wes Kaap, op sellulêre telefoon nommer 0737601587.
    Vir meer hier oor, kontak gerus vir die Moskee Voorsitter, Haji Abdul Alim Brenner van 492 Vlei Straat, Hopefield 7355, Wes Kaap, op sellulêre telefoon nommer 0729061770.
    Om meer hieroor te weet, bel asseblief vir die Moskee Trustee, Haji Mogammad Labieb Edross van 9 Coronation Laan, Woodstock 7925, Wes Kaap; huis telefoon 021 4487035, of op sellulêre telefoon nommer 0724518041.
    ’n Verdere kontak persoon is Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs. Hy woon by 48 Tennyson Straat, Mandalay 7785, Wes Kaap; huis telefoon nommer 021 3872737, of sellulêre telefoon nommer 0799153206.

  9. AbduRahmān al-Qādirī al-Athloni said

    The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah will assist in commemorating the Masjied ul Yunus in Heidelberg Milad al-Nabi Celebrations of Saturday, 25 January 2014.
    Heidelberg in the Southern Cape is after Swellendam and before Riversdale on the N2 motorway, and about 276 kilometres from Cape Town.
    Masjied ul Yunus in Heidelberg, Western Cape, South Africa, was first opened on Friday, 29 March 2013.
    Milad al-Nabi marks the birthday of the Chosen Prophet Muhammad (May the Peace and Blessings of God always be upon him). This festival is celebrated throughout the world and is a public holiday in most Arab countries.
    Everyone is invited to the festivities. Events will involve the formal Islamic prayer, the completion of an entire reading of the Glorious Qur’an and the Qadiriyyah dhikrullah. The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Group will glorify God, pronounce His Oneness, utter His Greatness, praise Him and implore God for His Forgiveness, Protection and Paradise.
    A big tent will be installed to accommodate the large number of worshippers. Refreshments will be served.
    For bus tickets to Heidelberg, please ring Haji Bienjamien Abrahams at home telephone number +2721 593-6585, or at cellular telephone 0827728381. He lives at 10 6th Street, Kensington 7405, Western Cape, South Africa.
    Another person to talk to is Haji Cassim Enoos Logday of 291 Main Road, Retreat 7945, Western Cape, South Africa, home telephone number +2721 701-3220.
    For further information, please speak to Haji Siraj Logday, Pet Adventure, 27 Warrington Road, Kenilworth 7700, Western Cape, South Africa; telephone +2721 671-1360 (business), +2721 839-7402 (home), cellular telephone number 0813056682; e-mail: petadv@telkomsa.net
    To know more about this occasion, please call Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs. His address is 48 Tennyson Street, Mandalay 7785, Western Cape, South Africa; home telephone number +2721 387-2737, cellular telephone 0799153206.
    A contact person is Sheikh Achmat Damon al-Qadiri al-Chishti of 6 Ladbrook Road, Kenwyn 7780, Western Cape, South Africa; home telephone number +2721 761-9768, cellular telephone number 0828693982.

  10. Haji Mogamat Ardiel Allie said

    On Saturday, 24th January 2015, the ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah will celebrate Milad al-Nabi with worshippers at the Langebaan Mosque on the South African west coast.
    Milad al-Nabi marks the birthday of the honourable Prophet Muhammad (May the Peace and Blessings of God be upon him).
    Everyone is invited to the celebrations. Refreshments will be served to the large crowd that is expected. Events will involve the formal Islamic prayer, the completion of an entire reading of the Undeniable Qur’an and the Qadiriyyah dhikrullah.
    The Qadiriyyah dhikrullah is a set of litanies that is connected with the 11th-century Muslim sage, al-Sultan al-Awliya al-Ghawth al-’Adham Sayed ’Abd Al-Qadir al-Jilani.
    The Qadiriyyah Sufi Order was the first order of Islamic spirituality, taking its name from Sayed ’Abd Al-Qadir al-Jilani (May God Be Pleased with him).
    For bus tickets to the Langebaan Masjid, please telephone Haji Bienjamien Abrahams at home telephone number +27 (0)21 593-6585, or at cellular telephone +27 (0)827728381. His address is 10 6th Street, Kensington 7405, Western Cape, South Africa.
    To learn more about this occasion, please call the Langebaan Masjid secretary, Haji Mogamat Ardiel Allie of 11 Robben Street, Langebaan 7357, Western Cape, South Africa, at telephone number +27 (0)21 797-2805, or at cellular telephone number +27 (0)837143309.
    Interested persons may speak to Haji Mogammad Shawaal Nakidien of 66 Comet Road, Surrey Estate 7764, Western Cape, South Africa, at telephone +27 (0)21 633-5330, or at cellular telephone number +27 (0) 824056380.
    A contact person is Haji Mogamat Rafaat Saffodien of 17 Aalwyn Street, Langebaan 7357, Western Cape, South Africa, cellular telephone number +27 (0)768872354.
    For further information, please speak to Haji Raashied Conrad of 84 Schaap Road, Schaapkraal 7941, Western Cape, South Africa, at telephone +27 (0)21 704-5614 (office), or at cellular telephone +27 (0)832309365.
    Another person to talk to is Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs. He stays at 48 Tennyson Street, Mandalay 7785, Western Cape, South Africa; home telephone number +27 (0)21 387-2737, or at cellular telephone number +27 (0)799153206.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: